Some Anecdotal Global Warming

While picking up some produce at the Bearss Grove farmers market today, I noticed that a wide span of land had been freshly tilled.  I inquired into what they were growing after having confirmed with the cashier that the produce at Publix really does suck – she claimed to have found a dead fetal rat inside a cubanelle pepper from Publix.

Chris, your local Farmer at the Bearss market, identified varieties of squash, a lot of dead corn from the frost and a few other vegetables that will soon be coming in fresh next to the market.

He also indicated some possible global warming scenarios.  Despite the brutal frost we’ve had here in Florida the past few weeks from the freak frigid Canadian air, he explained that the citrus season was very, very late.  Prior to the first frost the year, grapefruits are very bitter.  They contain too much chlorophyll.  The first cold snap of the year causes the chlorophyll to flee the fruit up into the leaves.   This produces a much sweeter fruit.  Something that is true for many varieties of fruits and berries.

This year’s cold snap occurred at least two weeks late, Chris claimed.  The grapefruit and citrus harvests occurred much earlier in previous years.  This means that the weather used to be much colder much earlier in the season, leading to a grapefruit harvest of early November.  Instead, this year’s harvest hit about mid-November.

My very elementary understanding of climatology indicates this trend is accurate.  Despite our anecdotal approach to climate, which more often than not is just weather, the planet is actually warming.  Farmers would obviously be the first to know.  These subtle changes impact their lives on a critical level.

So yes, it sure is cold out there.  There sure are a lot of cold fronts before Christmas this year.  But that’s weather.  Climate, on the other hand, is the regular-old-temperature from the regular old weather on average.  Which happens to be, apparently, two weeks warmer than it had been in bygone eras.

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